Tourette’s and other movement disorders

Tourette’s and movement disorders of multiple types (Parkinson’s, Torticollis, scoliosis, gait disorders, etc.) have been reversed with cranio-mandibular alignment therapy.  This connection is still not known by many doctors seven years after the publication of the information.  This connection is currently being investigated( https://www.tourette.org/blogs/research-medical/dental-devices-tics/).  The connection is often discounted by many doctors as they are often not aware of some very obscure neurology (jaw alignment sensors have massive representation in reticular formation (location of movement origination and sensory integration); see http://parkinsonstmj.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/tmj_and_reticular_formation007.pdf.  In addition, cranio-mandibular dysfunction causes “substance P” levels to become elevated, a known modulator of movement (substance P lowers cell membrane potential, thus causing cells to fire too readily; see central sensitization).

Multiple articles have been published linking movement disorders to cranio-mandibular dysfunction:

 

Most all modern humans  have substantial cranio-mandibular dysfunction (all primitive humans bit tip-to-tip, most  modern humans have an overbite).  This dysfunction manifests in a wide assortment of disorders, Tourette’s being only one of them.  Many studies have shown that people with cranio-mandibular dysfunction have very high medical utilization rates (i.e. http://tmjcalifornia.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/tmj-utilization-pdf.pdf)

Therapy entails using oral appliances to improve jaw function.  Functional tests, based on dental orthopedic principles are done (dysfunction not evident on x-rays) which illustrate the defects.  Appliances are modified and a adjusted till function is ideal and symptoms are resolved.  Typical treatment involves lower jaw advancement which necessitates molar eruption to stabilize.

TMJ twin block appliances

TMJ appliances used in Tourette’s treatment

 

 

 

 

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